WA – Washington

Flag courtesy of Wikipedia

The Space Needle, Seattle, Washington.

Photo courtesy of the CIA World Factbook

Washington government website just for reference.

The WADOT has a WADOT UAS Page.

Washington Legislature in case more laws were written since this book was published.

Map courtesy of Wikipedia

Google Earth

Last updated on June 7, 2024

Airspace

In addition to checking the FAA UAS Facility Map or B4UFLY or SkyVector or Google Maps one should consider also FAA JO 7400.10F – Special Use Airspace which is an order, published yearly, providing a listing of all regulatory and non-regulatory special use airspace areas, as well as issued but not yet implemented amendments to those areas established by the FAA.

Special Use Airspace consists of airspace of defined dimensions identified by an area on the surface of the earth wherein activities must be confined because of their nature, or wherein limitations are imposed upon aircraft operations that are not a part of those activities, or both. The vertical limits of special use airspace are measured by designated altitude floors and ceilings expressed as flight levels or as feet above MSL. Unless otherwise specified, the word “to” (an altitude or flight level) means “to and including” (that altitude or flight level). The horizontal limits of special use airspace are measured by boundaries described by geographic coordinates or other appropriate references that clearly define their perimeter. The period of time during which a designation of special use airspace is in effect is stated in the designation. All bearings and radials in this part are true from point of origin. Unless otherwise specified, all mileages in this part are stated as statute miles.

Restricted Areas: No person may operate an aircraft within a restricted area between the designated altitudes and during the time of designation, unless they have the advance permission of:

(a) The using agency described in § 73.15; or

(b) The controlling agency described in § 73.17.

These using agencies may be the agency, organization, or military command whose activity within a restricted area necessitated the area being so designated. Upon the request of the FAA, the using agency shall execute a letter establishing procedures for joint use of a restricted area by the using agency and the controlling agency, under which the using agency would notify the controlling agency whenever the controlling agency may grant permission for transit through the restricted area in accordance with the terms of the letter. The using agency shall:

(1) Schedule activities within the restricted area;

(2) Authorize transit through, or flight within, the restricted area as feasible; and

(3) Contain within the restricted area all activities conducted therein in accordance with the purpose for which it was designated.

For the purposes of this part, the controlling agency is the FAA facility that may authorize transit through or flight within a restricted area in accordance with a joint-use letter issued under § 73.15.

Prohibited Areas: No person may operate an aircraft within a prohibited area unless authorization has been granted by the using agency. For the purpose of this subpart, the using agency is the agency, organization or military command that established the requirements for the prohibited area.

Military Operations Areas: A Military Operations Area (MOA) is airspace established outside of Class A airspace to separate/segregate certain nonhazardous military activities from IFR traffic and to identify for VFR traffic where these activities are conducted. Activities. MOA’s are established to contain certain military activities such as air combat maneuvers, air intercepts, acrobatics, etc.

Alert Areas:  Airspace which may contain a high volume of pilot training activities or an unusual type of aerial activity, neither of which is hazardous to aircraft.

Warning Areas: A non regulatory warning area is airspace of defined dimensions designated over international waters that contains activity which may be hazardous to nonparticipating aircraft. The purpose of such warning areas is to warn nonparticipating pilots of the potential danger. Activities may be hazardous.

National Security Areas: A national security area (NSA) consists of airspace of defined vertical and lateral dimensions established at locations where there is a requirement for increased security of ground facilities. The purpose of such national security areas is to request pilot cooperation by voluntarily avoiding flight through the NSA. When circumstances dictate a need for a greater level of security, flight in an NSA may be temporarily prohibited by regulation under the provisions of 14 CFR Section 99.7, Special Security Instructions. Such prohibitions will be issued by FAA Headquarters and disseminated via the US NOTAM System.

 

 

Crewed Aircraft in your Airspace

CREWED AIRCRAFT

Lastly, if you want to be informed about crewed aircraft flying in the vicinity of your drone operation, you can always check with apps like FlightAware or ADS-B Exchange

 

Revised Code of Washington 47.68.420

RCW 47.68.420

Unpiloted aircraft system coordinator—Duties—Department may adopt rules—Report.

(1) Within amounts collected from commercial unpiloted aircraft registration fees pursuant to RCW 47.68.250(1), the aviation division director (also known as the senior state aviation official) or the aviation division director’s designee shall act as the unpiloted aircraft system coordinator. The unpiloted aircraft system coordinator serves primarily in an advisory role and is not authorized to direct unpiloted aircraft system operations, training, or policy outside the department. The duties of the unpiloted aircraft system coordinator include:

(a) Assisting with unpiloted aircraft system training and continuing education for state agencies;

(b) Coordinating with local governments on state and federal unpiloted aircraft system policies and regulations;

(c) Acting as a state level coordinator for unpiloted aircraft system operations during a governor declaration of emergency pursuant to RCW 43.06.210;

(d) Coordinating with the federal aviation administration and state agencies on unpiloted aircraft system trends;

(e) Identifying and disseminating information on unpiloted aircraft system training sites;

(f) Establishing and maintaining an unpiloted aircraft system coordination website for state and local governments;

(g) Assisting with the advancement of unpiloted aircraft systems across the state in coordination with the department of commerce, the aerospace industry, and the commercial unmanned aircraft systems industry;

(h) Acting as the principal advisor to the secretary on unpiloted aircraft system matters;

(i) Undertaking other unpiloted aircraft system coordination duties that are deemed appropriate by the aviation division director and the unpiloted aircraft system coordinator including, but not limited to, overseeing unpiloted aircraft system symposiums or other events for state agencies and other stakeholder groups.

(2) The department may adopt rules to implement this section.

(3) By December 1, 2022, the department shall provide a report to the transportation committees of the legislature and the department of commerce that provides details on the specific activities, accomplishments, and opportunities undertaken by the unpiloted aircraft system coordinator as to each of the duties provided in this section. The report must also be shared with interested aviation and aerospace industry stakeholders. The report shall include:

(a) Information on the specific activities, accomplishments, and opportunities taken by the aviation division director or the director’s designee in their role as the unpiloted aircraft system coordinator;

(b) A statement on the justification and need for the aviation division director or the director’s designee to continue to perform the specific activities of the unpiloted aircraft system coordinator; and

(c) Recommendations on any changes to the scope of the work and duties of the unpiloted aircraft system coordinator. This shall include recommendations on the reassignment of duties of the unpiloted aircraft system coordinator to the department’s aviation division and recommendations on the termination of the unpiloted aircraft system coordinator position.

Washington Administrative Code 172-110-010

WAC 172-110-010

Scope.

These rules govern the use of drones and model aircraft:

(1) By university employees and students operating a drone or model aircraft in any location as part of their university employment or as part of university activities; and

(2) The operation by any person of a drone or model aircraft on or above Eastern Washington University property.

Washington Administrative Code 172-110-020

WAC 172-110-020

University approval required.

The operation of drones and model aircraft is regulated by the FAA and relevant state law. Eastern Washington University is committed to ensuring compliance with those legal standards and reducing risks to safety, security, and privacy. The use of any drone or model aircraft either on or above university property or by a university employee or student during a university activity is prohibited, unless prior authorization for such use is obtained from the director of public safety in accordance with this chapter.

Washington Administrative Code 172-110-030

WAC 172-110-030

Definitions.

Throughout this chapter, the following definitions shall apply:

(1) “Eastern Washington University property” includes all buildings, grounds, and land that are owned, leased, occupied, and/or operated by Eastern Washington University.

(2) “Director” means the Eastern Washington University director of public safety or designee.

(3) “Drones” refers to all types of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) as defined by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and includes any aircraft that is operated without the possibility of direct human intervention from within or on the aircraft and associated elements.

(4) “Model aircraft” refers to unmanned aircraft systems that are used solely for hobby and/or recreational purposes. A model aircraft is capable of sustained flight and must be flown within the visual line of sight of the person operating the aircraft.

(5) “Navigable airspace” means the airspace of the United States above the minimum altitudes of flight prescribed by the regulations of the FAA, including airspace needed to ensure safety in the takeoff and landing of aircraft.

(6) “Commercial purpose” means the transportation of persons or property or other use of drones for compensation or hire.

Washington Administrative Code 172-110-040

WAC 172-110-040

University use of drones.

The university, in carrying out its educational, research, and service missions, may make use of drones when granted authorization to do so by the FAA.

A university employee or student who wishes to operate a drone as part of their university employment or an official university activity must contact the director. Any use must be approved in advance by the director. The director will ensure the use complies with FAA regulations and university policy. The director, in conjunction with the requestor, will submit any necessary requests for authorization to the FAA.

Any university employee, student, or unit purchasing a UAS (or the parts to assemble a UAS) with university funds or funds being disbursed through a university account, or grant funds, must contact the director to pursue needed approval(s).

Any use or work on UAS technology by university employees and students must comply with the International Traffic in Arms Regulations, Export Administration Regulations, and Office of Foreign Asset Control regulations.

Washington Administrative Code 172-110-050

WAC 172-110-050

Nonuniversity use of drones.

Anyone planning to use a drone on or above Eastern Washington University property for a nonuniversity purpose shall:

(1) Obtain approval from the director;

(2) Provide proof of FAA approval;

(3) Enter into a contract which holds the university harmless from any resultant claims or harm to individuals and damage to university property; and

(4) Provide proof of insurance as required by the director.

Washington Administrative Code 172-110-060

WAC 172-110-060

Use of model aircraft.

Use of model aircraft on or above Eastern Washington University property requires the advance approval of the director and is subject to the following restrictions:

(1) Model aircraft must be kept within visual sightline of the operator at all times;

(2) Model aircraft must weigh under fifty-five pounds unless certified by an aeromodeling community-based organization; and

(3) Model aircraft must be flown a sufficient distance from populated areas.

Use of a drone for university purposes, including research and instruction, does not fall within this section and must comply with WAC 172-110-040.

Washington Administrative Code 172-110-070

WAC 172-110-070

Prohibited locations for use of drones and model aircraft.

The use of drones and model aircraft is prohibited in areas where there is a reasonable expectation of privacy in accordance with accepted social norms. These areas include, but are not limited to, restrooms, locker rooms, in and around residential buildings or facilities, individual residential rooms, changing or dressing rooms, health treatment rooms, campus daycare facilities, and university offices and work areas. Drones and model aircraft may not be used to monitor or record institutional or personal information which may be found, for example, on computer or other electronic displays.

Washington Administrative Code 172-110-080

WAC 172-110-080

Director of public safety.

(1) The director of public safety shall ensure that the use of drones and model aircraft subject to these rules is in compliance with applicable federal and state laws.

(2) The director shall consider ethical issues related to a proposed use of drones or model aircraft prior to approving such use.

(3) The director shall keep the vice president for business and finance informed of any use of drones or model aircraft under these rules.

(4) In responding to a proposed use of a drone or model aircraft, the director may approve the use as proposed, may require modification of the proposal, or may deny the proposal.

(5) The director may deny any proposed use of a drone or model aircraft that he/she determines constitutes a commercial use or is otherwise not authorized under federal, state, or local laws or regulations.

(6) If the director denies a proposed use, the denial may be appealed, in writing, to the vice president for business and finance.

(7) The director shall provide ongoing review of approved drone and model aircraft use.

(8) With the approval of the vice president for business and finance, the director may develop procedures for implementing these rules.

(9) The director may suspend or terminate any use of drones or model aircraft deemed inconsistent with previously approved use, and/or the requirements of federal, state, or local regulations.

Washington Administrative Code 172-110-090

WAC 172-110-090

Violations.

The university may trespass or pursue other legal action against persons who violate this chapter.

Damages resulting from the use of drones or model aircraft shall be the responsibility of the persons or units involved.

Washington Administrative Code 200-250-010

WAC 200-250-010

Purpose.

The purpose of these rules is to make sure the use of unmanned aircraft on the state capitol campus is managed in a safe and secure manner by the department of enterprise services. Because of this, the state capitol campus is closed to launching, landing, or operating unmanned aircraft, subject to the conditions and exceptions described below.

Washington Administrative Code 200-250-020

WAC 200-250-020

Definitions.

(1) “Department” means the department of enterprise services.

(2) “Director” means the director of the department of enterprise services or his or her designee.

(3) “National airspace system” means is the airspace, navigation facilities and airports of the United States.

(4) “State capitol campus” means those grounds owned by the state and otherwise designated as the state capitol campus by the state capitol committee.

(5) “Unmanned aircraft” means a system or device that is used or intended to be used for flight in the air without the possibility of direct human intervention from within or on the device, and the associated operational elements and components that are required for the pilot or system operator in command to operate or control the device (such as cameras, sensors, communication links).

This term includes all types of systems or devices that meet this definition that are used for any purpose or activity, including but not limited to governmental, private, recreational, or commercial uses. Some examples of unmanned aircraft are model airplanes, quadcopters, and drones.

Washington Administrative Code 200-250-030

WAC 200-250-030

Use of unmanned aircraft is prohibited.

Launching, landing, or operating an unmanned aircraft from or on lands and waters within the boundaries of the state capitol campus is prohibited except for the exclusions listed under WAC 200-250-040.

Washington Administrative Code 200-250-040

WAC 200-250-040

Exclusions.

The prohibition on launching, landing, or operating unmanned aircraft on the state capitol campus under WAC 200-250-030 does not apply to:

(1) Emergency law enforcement and fire response operations;

(2) Other operations designed to support responses to health and human safety emergencies such as search and rescue, health and environmental incidents;

(3) National defense activities;

(4) Activities necessary for the care and custody of the state capitol campus when those activities have prior written approval by the director.

Washington Administrative Code 200-250-050

WAC 200-250-050

Requirements for obtaining advance approval of director under WAC 200-250-040(4).

(1) Use of unmanned aircraft must be approved in advance and in writing by the director.

(2) When considering approval, the director shall consider the criteria for the exception and whether the activity will:

(a) Present a clear and present danger to public health and safety;

(b) Cause injury or damage to state resources;

(c) Be contrary to the purposes for which the state capitol campus was established, or unacceptably impact the atmosphere of peace and tranquility maintained in natural, historic, or commemorative locations within the state capitol campus;

(d) Unreasonably interfere with the interpretive center, visitor services, other program activities, or with the administrative activities of enterprise services;

(e) Substantially impair the operations of enterprise services concessioners or contractors;

(f) Result in significant conflict with other existing uses.

(3) The director may condition any approval with appropriate time, place, and manner restrictions, which the requestor must follow.

(4) An approval issued by the director does not exempt the operator from obtaining the appropriate authorization from the federal aviation administration.

(5) Requirements put in place by the federal aviation administration on the use or operation of unmanned aircraft in the national airspace system must be followed. Nothing in this rule or enterprise services policies is intended to modify any requirement put in place by the federal aviation administration on the use or operation of unmanned aircraft in the national airspace system.

(6) Enterprise services will coordinate with the federal aviation administration regarding the use of unmanned aircraft on the state capitol campus as may be required.

(7) Applicable policies and rules put in place by the department must be followed, including but not limited to chapters 200-200 through 200-220 WAC.

(8) Applicable state requirements must be followed.

Washington Administrative Code 220-413-070

WAC 220-413-070

Hunting with aid of aircraft, boats or other vehicles.

(1) It is unlawful to use aircraft, including unmanned aircraft, to spot, locate or report the location of wildlife for the purpose of hunting; except as authorized by a permit issued by the director.

(2) It is unlawful to hunt wildlife from a vehicle, aircraft, including unmanned aircraft, except as authorized by a permit issued by the director, or from a boat propelled by motor unless the motor of such boat has been completely shut off and its progress has ceased.

(3) It is unlawful to use a vehicle, aircraft, unmanned aircraft, or motor-propelled boat for the purpose of pursuing, concentrating, or harassing any wild animal or wild bird, except as authorized by the department to aid in addressing wildlife conflict.

(4) It is unlawful to hunt big game on the day one was airborne in an aircraft, except on a regularly scheduled commercial airline flight.

(5) It is unlawful to hunt game animals, game birds, or migratory birds on the day one has operated an unmanned aircraft.

Washington Administrative Code 352-32-010

WAC 352-32-010

Definitions.

Whenever used in this chapter the following terms shall be defined as herein indicated:

“Aircraft” shall mean any machine designed to travel through the air, whether heavier or lighter than air; airplane, dirigible, balloon, helicopter, etc. The term aircraft shall not include paraglider or remote-controlled aircraft.

“Commercial recreation provider” is any individual or organization that packages and sells a service that meets the definition of a commercial recreation use.

“Commercial recreation use” is a recreational activity in a state park that is packaged and sold as a service by an organization or individual, other than state parks or a state park concessionaire.

“Commercial use (nonrecreation)” is any activity involving commercial or business purpose within a state park that may impact park facilities, park visitors or staff and is compatible with recreational use and stewardship, limited in duration and does not significantly block/alter access or negatively impact recreational users.

“Commission” shall mean the Washington state parks and recreation commission.

“Person” shall mean all natural persons, firms, partnerships, corporations, clubs, and all associations or combinations of persons whenever acting for themselves or by an agent, servant, or employee.

“Person related to the child” means those persons referred to in RCW 74.15.020 (2)(a)(i) through (vi).

“Public assembly” shall mean a meeting, rally, gathering, demonstration, vigil, picketing, speechmaking, march, parade, religious service, or other congregation of persons for the purpose of public expression of views of a political or religious nature for which there is a reasonable expectation that a minimum of twenty persons will attend based on information provided by the applicant. Public assemblies must be open to all members of the public, and are generally the subject of attendance solicitations circulated prior to the event, such as media advertising, flyers, brochures, word-of-mouth notification, or other form of prior encouragement to attend.

Alternatively, the agency director or designee may declare an event to be a public assembly in the following cases: Where evidentiary circumstances and supporting material suggest that more than one hundred persons will attend, even where the applicant does not indicate such an expectation; or where there is reason to expect a need for special preparations by the agency or the applicant, due to the nature or location of the event.

“Remote controlled aircraft” shall mean nonpeopled model aircraft and other unmanned aircraft systems, including those commonly known as “drones” that are flown by using internal combustion, electric motors, elastic tubing, or gravity/wind for propulsion. The flight is controlled by a person on the ground using a hand held radio control transmitter.

“Special recreation event” shall mean a group recreation activity in a state park sponsored or organized by an individual or organization that requires reserving park areas, planning, facilities, staffing, or other services beyond the level normally provided at the state park to ensure public welfare and safety and facility and/or environmental protection.

“Vehicle” shall include every device capable of being moved upon a public highway and in, upon, or by which any persons or property is or may be transported or drawn upon a public highway. For the purposes of this chapter, this definition excludes bicycles, wheelchairs, motorized foot scooters, electric personal assistive mobility devices (EPAMDs), snowmobiles and other nonlicensed vehicles.

Washington Administrative Code 352-32-130

WAC 352-32-130

Aircraft.

(1) No aircraft shall land on or take off from any body of water or land area in a state park area not specifically designated for landing aircraft. This provision does not apply to official aircraft used in the performance of search and rescue missions, medical emergencies, law enforcement activities, emergency evacuations or firefighting activities. It also does not apply in cases where the director or designee specifically authorizes such landings or take offs, in writing, associated with the operational, or administrative needs of the agency or state.

(2) Individuals who have complied with the registration process provided or who have obtained a special recreation event permit pursuant to WAC 352-32-047may launch and land paragliders and hang gliders in state park areas specifically designated by the director or designee as available for paragliding and hang gliding. Prior to any such designation, the director or designee shall advertise and conduct a public meeting in the region where the park is located. The director or designee shall consider the potential impacts of paragliding and hang gliding in the proposed area including, but not limited to the following factors: The degree of conflict paragliding and hang gliding may have with other park uses, public safety issues, and any potential damage to park resources/facilities. Any park designated for paragliding and hang gliding shall be conspicuously posted as such by the agency.

(3) Individuals paragliding and hang gliding in state parks must:

(a) Comply with the registration process provided for such purposes;

(b) Observe all applicable laws and regulations;

(c) Never destroy or disturb park facilities, natural features, or historical or archaeological resources;

(d) Conduct themselves with thoughtfulness, courtesy and consideration for others, and not interfere with other recreational activities;

(e) Conduct themselves in compliance with the following basic safety regulations:

(i) Comply with specific site operational restrictions that are posted;

(ii) Fly in a manner consistent with the pilot rating held;

(iii) Preplanned landings should be made in areas no smaller than forty feet wide by one hundred feet long;

(iv) Make preflight checks of weather, equipment and site conditions;

(v) Observe all published traffic and right of way flight guidelines, including yielding right of way to all aircraft;

(vi) Wear protective clothing, headgear, Coast Guard approved flotation gear, reserve parachute, supplemental oxygen and communication equipment as appropriate for conditions;

(vii) Fly in a manner that does not create a hazard for other persons or property;

(viii) Fly only during daylight hours, or hours otherwise specified by posting at the site;

(ix) Do not fly over congested areas of parks or open air assembly of persons;

(x) Fly only in designated areas of parks;

(xi) Fly with visual reference to the ground surface at all times;

(xii) Do not tether paragliders or hang gliders to the ground or other stable immovable object.

(f) Not fly while under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

(4) Except as provided in subsection (5) of this section, individuals flying remote controlled aircraft may do so only within flying areas designated by the director or designee and only when following the remote controlled aircraft management plan approved by the director or designee and posted for that designated area.

(a) Prior to designating any remote controlled aircraft flying area, the director or designee shall advise and conduct a public meeting in the region where the park is located. The director or designee shall consider the potential impacts of remote controlled aircraft flying in the proposed area including, but not limited to, the following factors: The degree of conflict remote controlled aircraft flying may have with other park uses, public safety issues, and any potential damage to park resources/facilities. Any park area designated for remote controlled aircraft flying shall be conspicuously posted as such by the director or designee.

(b) The director or designee shall establish a committee to advise park staff on park management issues related to remote controlled aircraft flying for each state park area designated as a remote controlled aircraft flying area.

(c) Each state park area with an established advisory committee, which includes remote controlled aircraft flyers will have an approved management plan which will specify remote controlled aircraft flying restrictions concerning types of aircraft, flying hours, identified approved flying zones, identified runways for take-offs and landings, engine muffler requirements, use of and posting of radio frequency, fuel spills and cleanup. The director or designee shall ensure that any remote controlled aircraft flying restrictions contained in the remote controlled aircraft flying management plan are conspicuously posted at the entrance of the affected park area.

(d) The director or designee may permanently, or for a specified period or periods of time, close any designated flying area to remote controlled aircraft flying if the director or designee concludes that a remote controlled aircraft flying closure is necessary for the protection of the health, safety, and welfare of the public, park visitors or staff, or park resources. Prior to closing any designated flying area to remote controlled aircraft flying, the director or designee shall hold a public meeting near the state park area to be closed to remote controlled aircraft flying. Prior notice of the meeting shall be published in a newspaper of general circulation in the area and at the park at least thirty days prior to the meeting. In the event that the director or designee or park manager determines that it is necessary to close a designated flying area immediately to protect against an imminent and substantial threat to the health, safety, and welfare of the public, park visitors or staff, or park resources, the director or designee or park manager may take emergency action to close a state park area to remote controlled aircraft flying without first complying with the publication and meeting requirements of this subsection. Such emergency closure may be effective for only so long as is necessary for the director or designee to comply with the publication and meeting requirements of this subsection. The director or designee shall ensure that any designated flying area closed to remote controlled aircraft flying is conspicuously posted as such at the entrance of the affected park area.

(5) Remote controlled aircraft may be flown in any state park area only pursuant to issuance of permit by the director or designee. A remote controlled aircraft is flown in a state park area when the operator is within the state park area while flying the remote controlled aircraft or where the remote controlled aircraft takes off from or lands on the state park area.

(a) In granting such permit, the director or designee may specify time, geographic, and elevation restrictions, and any other restrictions necessary to protect the public, park visitors or staff, or park resources. While operating a remote controlled aircraft, the operator must be in possession of a copy of the written permission and will produce it upon request by parks staff. Permission granted by the director or designee to fly a remote controlled aircraft may be rescinded at any time for permittee’s failure to comply, to protect the public, park visitors or staff, or park resources.

(b) Permit applications must be submitted at least sixty days in advance of the proposed activity to allow for staff review, agency coordination, and to comply with SEPA review requirements. The sixty-day application filing requirement may be waived in extenuating circumstances.

(c) The permittee must pay any fees published by state parks for the use of park lands or facilities. The director or designee will determine the need for any fees necessary to cover costs incurred by the agency, as well as the need for any bond, damage deposit, or liability insurance arising from any potential hazards associated with the character of the event. Any such fees, bond, damage deposit, or liability insurance must be provided prior to the issuance of the permit.

(6) Any violation of this section, including any failure to abide by a conspicuously posted remote controlled aircraft flying restriction or failure to abide by the terms of written permission to fly remote controlled aircraft, is an infraction under chapter  7.84 RCW.

City of Bellevue Parks and Community Services

City of Bellevue Parks and Community Services

With the increased popularity of drones over the years, chances are that either you or a neighbor will be interested in piloting a new recreational aircraft.

Drones are not allowed in Bellevue Parks to ensure the safety and enjoyment of all visitors. Private and commercial requests to operate drones (UAS) will not be approved to take off/land/operate on parks property unless the applicant is a Local Government Agency, one of the City’s non-profit community partners, or an entity with an easement or right of entry over the proposed flight area. All other private and commercial requests will not be approved.

Pilots are encouraged to use their drones at Marymoor Park Airfield. This nearby alternative welcomes recreational model aircraft. Drone users need to register with the FAA and follow the safety and liability requirements of the MAR/C Club. To register and become a member, go to http://mar-c.org/

An alternative flying site is available at 60 Acres Park, based on availability. For more information, go to the 60 Acres web site and fill out a field request.

Download this handy drone guide for flying in the area.

Know Before You Fly is a great resource created in partnership with the FAA.

If you see a drone hovering in your backyard, consider checking with your neighbors to see if a new pilot is at the helm. A simple conversation may eliminate misunderstandings.

For more information, or to report an incident in a park, please call Bellevue Parks at 425-452-7225. If it is an emergency situation, residents should contact the Bellevue Police at 9-1-1.

If you believe your request to fly on Parks property may qualify for approval, please contact Jammie Kingham, Environmental Program Supervisor at jkingham@bellevuewa.gov or 425-452-6048.

Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary

Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary

Olympic Coast regulations prohibit disturbing wildlife in the sanctuary by operating aircraft below 2,000 feet above ground level, within one nautical mile of the coast and offshore rocks and islands. Failure to maintain a minimum altitude of 2,000 feet above ground level over such waters is presumed to disturb marine mammals or seabirds (15 CFR Part 922.152).

Sanctuary boundaries extend from the mouth of the Copalis River to Koitlah Point at Neah Bay. Takeoff and landings at Copalis Beach airstrip are unaffected.

Orting City Ordinance 8-6-6

Orting City Ordinance 8-6-6

MOTOR VEHICLES AND BICYCLES:

Model Aircraft And Rockets:

Certain Areas: No one shall fly rockets or model aircraft in any park except in areas specifically designated and/or posted for that purpose.

Engines To Be Muffled: All engines over 0.25 CI used in model aircraft being flown in designated park areas shall be muffled.

Abide By Safety Code: All persons flying model aircraft in designated park areas shall abide by the official AMA safety code.

Pierce County Code Chapter 1.30

Pierce County Code Chapter 1.30

Freedom from Unwarranted Surveillance

1.30.010 Definitions.

As used in this Chapter, the following terms shall have the following meanings:

“Drone” means any powered aerial vehicle that does not carry a human operator, uses aerodynamic forces to provide vehicle lift, can fly autonomously or be piloted remotely, can be expendable or recoverable and can carry a lethal or nonlethal payload but does not include satellites.

“Unmanned Aircraft” means an aircraft that is operated without the possibility of direct human intervention from within or on the aircraft.

1.30.020 Restrictions on Gathering Evidence.

No County department or agency shall use a drone or other unmanned aircraft to gather evidence or other information pertaining to criminal conduct or conduct in violation of a statute, ordinance, regulation or rule, except as authorized by state and federal law.

1.30.030 Use of Unmanned Aircraft – Exigent Circumstances.

The provisions of this Chapter do not prohibit the use of a drone when exigent circumstances exist.

1.30.040 Remedies for Violation of this Chapter – Use of Information Obtained.

No information obtained or collected in violation of the provisions of this Chapter may be admissible as evidence in an administrative hearing conducted pursuant to Chapter 1.22 PCC.

Seattle Municipal Code 18.12.265

Seattle Municipal Code 18.12.265

Motorized models.

It is unlawful to operate any motorized model aircraft or motorized model watercraft in any park except at places set apart by the Superintendent for such purposes or as authorized by a permit from the Superintendent.

Seattle Office of Film and Music

Commercial Filming Use of Drones

Flying an Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS or “Drone”) in the City of Seattle for commercial photography purposes requires operators to be fully licensed by the Federal Aviation Authority (FAA), as well as follow all 14 CFR Part 107 requirements. In some instances, a City of Seattle Master Film Permit is required for use.

Snohomish County Code 22.16.080

Snohomish County 22.16.080

Radio/remote controlled, self propelled devices – Operation.

No person shall operate any radio/remote controlled unmanned aircraft or self propelled model airplane, glider, car, boat or any model rocket within a county park except in areas specifically designated by the parks division and posted for such use.

University Drone Policies

Eastern Washington University

Pacific Lutheran University

University of Puget Sound

University of Washington filming on campus

University of Washington – Tacoma UAS policy

Walla Walla University

Washington State University

Western Washington University

Whitworth University

Note: This list is just a sample… many more could be added.

Advanced Air Mobility (AAM)

2020 – WSDOT – Washington Electric Aircraft Feasibility Study

2023 – Lyte, AAM Institute launch ferry alternatives with SkyBus LA-44 in Seattle, Washington

2023 – Lyte Aviation CEO: SkyBus ideal for Seattle, Microsoft employees

 

Short Essay Questions

Question 1

You have been hired by a Drone Startup Company. Your boss has immediately assigned this job to you.

They need you to prepare a one-page memo detailing the legalities of using your drone for inspecting the Space Needle, pictured above.

They need you to mention any state laws and local ordinances.

They specifically want to know what airspace you will be operating in, and whether or not you need an airspace authorization, with or without LAANC capability.

Lastly, there is a bonus for you if, as you scroll through this chapter, you find any typos or broken links!

Question 2

Do the state drone laws implicate the First Amendment? If so, describe, citing the exact law.

Question 3

Do the state drone laws implicate the Fourth Amendment? Or involve law enforcement officers obtaining warrants? If so, describe, citing the exact law.

Question 4

Do the state drone laws contain a preemption clause? If so, describe, citing the exact law.

Question 5

Does the state have UAM/AAM laws? If so, describe, citing the exact law.

Question 6

Are you aware of any new laws or policies not mentioned above? If so, describe, citing the exact law or policy.

 

 

 

 

License

Icon for the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

Drones Across the World Copyright © 2023 by Sarah Nilsson is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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