169 Thailand

Five horizontal bands of red (top), white, blue (double width), white, and red. The red color symbolizes the nation and the blood of life, white represents religion and the purity of Buddhism, and blue stands for the monarchy.

Flag courtesy of the CIA World Factbook

Map courtesy of the CIA World Factbook

Google Earth

A Yaksha demon guards the Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha) in the Grand Palace in Bangkok.

Photo courtesy of the CIA World Factbook

Thailand is a member of ICAO and JARUS.
Last updated on July 5, 2024

Government

According to Britannica, Thailand is a constitutional monarchy with the monarch as the head of state. While almost every government since 1932 has accepted constitutional authority, the country has had 17 constitutions, the most recent drafted in 2007. All of these documents have provided for a National Assembly with a prime minister as head of government. Power is exercised by the bicameral National Assembly, the Council of Ministers, and the courts in accordance with the provisions of the constitution and laws passed by the National Assembly. The constitution of 2007 (largely based on that of 1997) provides for the direct election of members of the lower house of the Assembly, the House of Representatives, to four-year terms, five-sixths from single-member districts and the remainder based on proportional representation from the political parties. It also requires the prime minister to be a member of the House of Representatives. Members of the upper house, the Senate, are directly elected to six-year terms. Legislation originates in the House of Representatives, but it can be modified or rejected by the Senate.

In May 2014, following a military coup, the 2007 constitution was suspended (except provisions pertaining to the monarchy), and a council of military leaders took power. That council appointed a 200-member single-chamber interim legislature in late July. The leader of the council was named interim prime minister in late August.

The execution of laws is carried out by the civil service, whose members are known as kharatchakan, “servants of the king.” The bureaucracy, particularly the Ministry of Interior, has always enjoyed a significant degree of autonomy in administering the country. The number of elective offices and senior civil-service positions occupied by women is small, though increasing slowly.

For most people in Thailand, government is experienced primarily through centrally appointed officials who hold posts in local administration, the main units of which are provinces (changwat) and districts (amphur). In the 1990s three new provinces were carved out of the existing ones, resulting in a total of 76.

A marked devolution of power has taken place since the 1980s. By far the most significant of the local governing bodies are those in the major cities, including Bangkok, Chiang Mai, and Pattaya. Locally elected provincial assemblies have little power, but they serve as incubators for local politicians who may later be elected to the National Assembly. In 1997, communes (tambon), units consisting of several villages, were given increased powers and the authorization to elect members of tambon administrative organizations. With new administrative and financial authority, these bodies have become the most important local democratic units in Thailand. Headmen of villages (muban) are also elected, but their authority is circumscribed by centrally appointed district officers and the tambon administrative organizations.

Thailand had a sophisticated legal system before Western influences led it to adopt a system of jurisprudence based on European models. The first law codes—dating from as early as the 15th century—were based on the Indian code of Manu, which arrived by way of the Mon and the Khmer. As part of the modernizing reforms of the late 19th century, a new legal system was developed, based primarily on the French (Napoleonic) model. The modernizing government of King Chulalongkorn also received legal advice from British advisers. A significant aspect of the legal reforms of the late 19th century was the creation of an independent judiciary. This ideal proved difficult to realize, however, because of interference by politicians and the continuing presence of corruption within the system. As part of a series of judicial reforms initiated at the end of the 20th century, the Supreme Court, with justices appointed by the monarch, was declared the final court of appeal for both civil and criminal cases; a system of intermediary appeals courts was established to handle cases from courts of first instance scattered throughout the country.

Civil / National Aviation Authority (CAA/NAA)

The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) of Thailand, is an independent agency of the Thai government under the oversight of the Minister of Transport. Its responsibilities includes prescribing, regulating, and auditing Thai civil aviation.

Airspace

SkyVectorGoogle MapsADS-B Exchange

ICAO countries publish an Aeronautical Information Publication (AIP). This document is divided into three parts: General (GEN), En Route (ENR) and Aerodromes (AD). ENR 1.4 details the types of airspace classes they chose to adopt from classes A through G. Thailand AIP

airspace classification

airspace classification

airspace classification

Drone Regulations

RPA laws

RPA to be registered

Registration RPA

– RPA with camera installed must be registered with no exceptions.

– RPA over 2 KGs must be registered with no exceptions

Drone Registration

rpa-eng

Announcement of the Ministry of Transport

announcement of the ministry of transport

announcement of the ministry of transport

announcement of the ministry of transport

announcement of the ministry of transport

announcement of the ministry of transport

announcement of the ministry of transport

announcement of the ministry of transport

Advanced Air Mobility (AAM)

2024 – SkyDrive signs MoU to explore new business options for eVTOLs in Thailand

 

 

Short Essay Questions

Question 1

You have been hired by a Drone Startup Company. Your boss has immediately assigned this job to you.

They need you to prepare a one-page memo detailing the legalities of using a drone to film the Grand Palace in Bangkok, pictured above.

They need you to mention any national laws and local ordinances.

They specifically want to know what airspace you will be operating in and whether or not you need an airspace authorization.

Does it matter whether or not you are a citizen of the country?

Lastly, there is a bonus for you if, as you scroll through this chapter, you find any typos or broken links!

Question 2

Do you need a certificate to fly UAS?

If so, how do you obtain one?

Are there fees associated with this?

If so, how much?

Question 3

May you operate beyond visual line of sight?

If so, what procedures must you follow?

Question 4

Does the country have UAM/AAM laws? If so, describe, citing the exact law.

Question 5

Are you aware of any new laws or policies not mentioned above? If so, describe, citing the exact law or policy.

 

 

 

 

License

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Drones Across the World Copyright © 2023 by Sarah Nilsson is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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